Look, No Hands!

Ridiculousness at its Best

5 notes

thefantasticspastic1995:

Let’s just take a few moments to appreciate the fact that a movie that centres around a world with dragons in it, saw no need to magically cure the two heroes of their disabilities. THEY HAD DRAGONS, PEOPLE. THERE ARE NO EXCUSES!

174,821 notes

ccesamestreet:

spydercyde:

obsessionthenarglesmademedoit:

But why the last one thoughwhat am I not getting

I can’t breath…I have not laughed this hard in years 

Okay, quick story about the last one- I go to this school too, and the creative writing teacher is rad as hell (like the kind to give out free coffee on fridays)
After all of the kids have submitted their short stories, he reads them all for the first time to his two kids, who help him grade them, in a way.
One time, a girl wrote a story about a sheep, named Trixie, making her dream come true by moving to the big city to become an actress, a singer, or whatever (he was pretty vague on the description) 
She took a bus and a few trains and finally ended up in the ‘Big City’, where she tries to make her dream come true.
Now I dont remember the exact sequence of events that came next, but Trixie the sheep eventually ended up becoming a prostitute mid-sentence.
Our teacher didnt really realize this at the time, since it was his first time reading it, and to his kids he was caught completely off guard. And lets just say he had to explain a few new concepts to his kids that night..
And that’s why we can’t write any more stories about Trixie going to the Big City.

ccesamestreet:

spydercyde:

obsessionthenarglesmademedoit:

But why the last one though
what am I not getting

I can’t breath…I have not laughed this hard in years 

Okay, quick story about the last one- I go to this school too, and the creative writing teacher is rad as hell (like the kind to give out free coffee on fridays)

After all of the kids have submitted their short stories, he reads them all for the first time to his two kids, who help him grade them, in a way.

One time, a girl wrote a story about a sheep, named Trixie, making her dream come true by moving to the big city to become an actress, a singer, or whatever (he was pretty vague on the description) 

She took a bus and a few trains and finally ended up in the ‘Big City’, where she tries to make her dream come true.

Now I dont remember the exact sequence of events that came next, but Trixie the sheep eventually ended up becoming a prostitute mid-sentence.

Our teacher didnt really realize this at the time, since it was his first time reading it, and to his kids he was caught completely off guard. And lets just say he had to explain a few new concepts to his kids that night..

And that’s why we can’t write any more stories about Trixie going to the Big City.

(Source: media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com, via thefantasticspastic1995)

79 notes

4 Lessons from My Failed Project as an Able-Bodied Ally

queerability:

This past January I had an idea for a project.  I work for a transition program in Berkeley, CA that provides life skills training and support for young people as they enter adulthood.  All of the students are developmentally and/or intellectually disabled and typically coming out of a lifetime of “special” education.  Each student contends with an enormous amount of subtle and overt discrimination.  Seeing this day after day – their competence questioned, their abilities undervalued – is an outrage, and I wanted everyone to be outraged with me.  I wanted my students to yell at people who wouldn’t talk to them directly or who condescendingly congratulated them on everyday tasks.  I wanted these people to feel remorse.  Sparked by this newly found injustice, I designed a photography project that would – I believed –both empower my students and be a part of a viral marketing campaign to the world at large.

The plan was to photograph the students with written messages of personal pride, and then create an online network that anyone in the disability community could contribute to.  Brilliant!  This was going to be huge.  I had a photography team lined up and a timeline for completion – all in a matter of days.  Then, the director of my program (who is himself Autistic) came to me with some concerns.  He delicately questioned my inclusion of disabled people in the planning process, and my intentions for the overall message.  Under the strength of my conviction, and the self-importance I felt in my role as a teacher and, importantly, an “ally” to the disability community, I defended my decision.  I argued that I was merely amplifying the student’s messages and not my own.  I knew I could organize it successfully, and I wanted to go ahead.

It took me a number of days, a number of conversations, and a number of uncomfortable feelings before I fully realized why the project was so problematic.  It wasn’t an act of allyship and I wasn’t an ally.  I had deluded myself into thinking the project was not about me, when it clearly was.  I needed the project to look and feel the way I wanted it to, to appeal to a certain type of person.   And I needed my students to be seen by others (able-bodied others) the way that I (an only slightly more educated able-bodied person) saw them.   When I finally came to understand this, I was overwhelmed by shame.

Some people may have read this story shaking their heads, appropriately disgusted.  Others, and I have encountered many in my subsequent discussions on the experience, may still not fully understand what the big deal is.  Isn’t “helping others” good?  Don’t social justice movements need all the “allies” they can get?  Yes and no.  Helping other people is good – if and when they seek help – but without an appropriate understanding of allyship, the help given by a privileged “ally” is more often a perpetuation of oppression than an act of solidarity.

More at the link. The title is a link.

(via thefantasticspastic1995)

44,126 notes

sonnet-of-joy:

hoshispades:

hoshispades:

everybodys got a water buffalo 

stop stop right this instant what do you think youre doing

you cant say everyones got a water buffalo everyone does not have a water buffalo we’re going to get nasty letters saying wheres my water buffalo why dont i have a water buffalo and are you prepared to deal with that i dont think so stop being so silly

image

Everybody’s got a baby kangaroo…

(Source: lovepact, via thefantasticspastic1995)

84,294 notes

thefantasticspastic1995:

elfpen:

prismatic-bell:

neverwillstop:

billboard-charts:

blackgirlnerds:

pawntakesqueen:

Belle featurette from Fox Searchlight Pictures

AHH! CanNOT wait for this to come out!!

i love the fact that a black woman directed this

Black woman director. Black woman writer. Black woman lead. Love this.

Everybody get the fuck out there and watch it. Take a friend. Take two friends. Go twice.

Remember:

Hollywood has a vested interest in watching this film fail.

Hollywood does not like leads who are not white men.

Hollywood tolerates writers who are not men, but not often.

Hollywood doesn’t like directors who aren’t white men, either, unless they’re Alfonso Cuaron, who is still a man.

Hollywood likes to prove that these are films that “people”—that means you, that means me—will not watch, so they can go back to making movies where the men are white and the women are props.

Make this film explode. Make it impossible to ignore. See it opening weekend and tell everyone you meet how it spoke to you and why.

Look for online reviews and leave comments. If your local newspaper has no critic section, write a letter to the editor. Tell a friend. Tell two friends. Tell your mother’s friends who like romcoms.

You can do something just by spending ten bucks and opening your mouth about it.

What are you doing? You’re encouraging visibility. You’re encouraging diversity. You’re encouraging women in an industry that’s very Good Ole Boys Club.

And also, you get to see what looks like it’s going to be one damned fine movie.

I’m really excited for this movie! It looks like it’ll be really good!

I saw this movie. It was amazing!
*I didn’t cry, you cried*